Semper Fi

Semper Fi - Keira Andrews This is very touching.



But after all those reviews, all those warnings, the heavy plot... I expected a much more "angsty" tale and it wasn't like that. The relationship between these two was an addiction. Cal feels an attraction towards Jim since the very beginning but Jim is straight and worse, he is married and with a child. So, he's off-limits. But once you taste it you just can not stop.



When the first Europeans reached what we call today Chile they met some sort of messengers in those high mountains. These men were nothing alike they had ever seen before: they could run for miles and miles and needed almost no rest, so the information flowed at an extraordinary speed, a lightning almost. In fact, they could live without food and with no sleep if necessary but they could not live without those little leaves they chewed now and then. And you better not take those leaves from them, because they truly suffered then. They were their precious.



This story is a lot about the longing and the pain you have when you can't have something. But it's not as agonizing as I though it would be. It's a very beautiful novel, truth be said. They are mates and best friends before lovers. And you can feel that companionship and veiled love and not so hidden fear for each other. Cal knows it for sure but Jim is totally blind. When they meet again, Cal's longing awakes full force and he is not sure he will be able to keep a distance and little by little Jim has sinful thoughts he feels embarrassed about. But weirdly he can't control and erase them. And when he gives up the surrendering is so sweet and fulfilling he can't believe this is forbidden and bad.



When I read [b:Kick at the Darkness|25543022|Kick at the Darkness|Keira Andrews|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1431698141s/25543022.jpg|45335099] I knew that I had been stupid. Again. Procrastinating when I should not have. But I'm that way. This is no excuse now, I have to go on with this author. Because she's worth it. At least that's what se has proven to me so far.



I must say I was a little disappointed the constant skips past-to-present in every chapter would frustrate me, but that wasn't the case. The anecdotes and episodes about the WWII are written in four pages and then we were in 1948 for a while longer. So in the end this was all very satisfying because KA never failed to give a good rhythm to the story.



However, there was always something lost for me, this book didn't exactly tickle my fancy. I was a little off when I didn't feel the same as with [b:Kick at the Darkness|25543022|Kick at the Darkness|Keira Andrews|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1431698141s/25543022.jpg|45335099]. I don't find any imperfection per se, except that this romance didn't exactly grab me although I devoured the pages as if it was clear water after a day in the desert. I just can't put a finger on it, but something was amiss, IMHO.

And when you finally find out what happened in Okinawa (Jim's nightmares are related to it and it's a topic to be avoided in most conversations) it didn't feel right, but not because it wasn't awful, but because I couldn't feel the traumatic meaning that episode has for Jim, I couldn't feel his despair, his shock, his incredulity and his inability to accept it and live with himself. When the mystery was out I was like "Is that everything?". Maybe after lots of violence in movies I'm not impressed anymore, but I notice when an author manages to move me, there are just some who have that power, but I didn't feel as if KA measured up to it.

The aspect I liked the least was the mystery part, which is very weak. I don't like thrillers but even I myself could guess what happened to Ann and why did Eddie flee. Above all when Jim will fall in love with Cal and of course, to make him not seem a bad husband, then Ann will be demonstrated not to had been happy in their marriage because she needed more and that's why she cheated on him with the employee. Not original at all.

But I loved the children. I don't know why some children are described in a very annoying way but here they were perfect. I loved Sophie and her mistrust and her mischief at first, it was something I would definitely do, so she is very cool. Then she begins to understand that Uncle Cal is not a bad person at all, and I liked her better. She was never a stupid kid although she didn't behave well part of the time. Because she has a head over her shoulders, she has character and personality.



And when the final chapter came, I just knew we would see some of Cal and Jim together, and I hoped for the best-case scenario: after the kids have grown up and flew the nest, so they would sleep together at night since at last. But the one chosen by the writer is a superb option, I really enjoyed it and think about it as a lovely closure.